Logic Pro Recording Guitar

16 May

Record Your Guitar Master piece  Now With Logic Pro

logic pro recording guitar

This Logic Pro recording guitar article reveals how you can record quality electric guitar play using a microphone system in Apple’s Logic Pro, and running it through video at the same time. There was a time when recording electric guitars by directing a microphone into an amplifier was the only ideal way available.

Things have changed for the better these days with the introduction of analogue and digital guitar recording preamps, speaker simulators (both active and passive), and new software with preamp plug-ins.

You can even opt to purchase a speaker cabinet system and use it in soundproofed environments. To do this you have to connect using an amplifier and “mic” it up without having to worry about sound leaks going out of the room (the microphone is set up inside the box together with the speaker).

What option you would want to try out primarily depends on whatever recording tools you have with you right now, plus the sound output you want to achieve.

Logic Pro Recording Guitar Tip – Your Microphone

To “mic” an amplifier effectively, you need a great-sounding amp (this means using a tube amplifier). A smaller amp would be ideal since it’s easy to mic up. Following this, you can use whatever microphone you have with you and still get ideal tonality. Where you place the microphone is more crucial than its brand and power. There are even times when certain microphones that give human vocals a bad name can work well for guitars.

You’ll eventually notice how the sound is more focused whenever moving the mic closer to your speaker; it becomes mellow once moved away. A guitar amp off the floor also affects the output since sonic reflections to the surfaces will be mixed into the direct sound produced. Whatever the case is, you can expect better results by backing your microphone a bit away from your speaker (a few centimeters would do).

Logic Pro Recording Guitar Tip – Speaker Simulators

 

While it’s perfectly normal for cranked up guitar amplifiers to cause some problems with spill, using a power soak together with a speaker simulator allows you to utilize a specialist guitar DI unit that incorporates DI box functions to a filter network to simulate frequency response. You can do this without connecting to the speaker and still get that ideal natural tone every guitar master wanted. You must realize you’ll get drastically varying results when using a particular model or another.

 

Logic Pro Recording Guitar Tip – Digital Modeling

While some electric guitar players everywhere may still be using impressive analogue recording preamps, digital models are clearly the face of the future, especially when we all start talking about convenience and versatility. Apple’s Logic Pro is now one of the big boys in this particular stage. With the inclusion of a simple, yet useful preamp plug-in for the guitar, digital emulations are an awe to listen to. Tonal versatility, efficient pickup of the intensity, or the ability to back off the volume control of the guitar without compromising the output, you name it, Logic Pro has all it.

Logic Pro Recording Guitar Tip – The Guitar Rig 5

 

The Guitar Rig 5 is the latest software version designed primarily for amplifier modeling using the electric guitar. This allows real-time, digitized signal processing in studio and standalone environments. Together with Apple’s Logic Pro 9, it is your best software solution for an excellent customized toning using more amp effects and creative potential you can muster.

Using it in conjunction with the Logic Pro will make a powerful virtual effects rack, especially when two new high-gain amps and powerful new effects are added into the equation. It becomes even more impressive with the support of Guitar Rig 5’s nineteen new exquisitely-modeled cabinets, and the Control Room Pro, so you can take customization to a new level.

Routing your outputs coming from the Guitar Rig 5 software and inputting them into you Logic Pro 9 is simple enough that it becomes as user-friendly as to how Logic Pro would master mixes. You click the insets designed for the Audio Track inside Logic Pro. Click on the inserts, leading to the Audio Units section. This then brings you to the Native Instruments category; clicking on it reveals the Guitar Rig 5 FX feature. Find the mono option, click it, and you will be led to the Stereo option. This will finally open up Guitar Rig 5 under your Logic Pro Workstation.

Check that you got the correct input channel for your chosen track. Check if the “I” (input monitoring button) is enabled in the sequencer’s audio track as well. You can now hit the record button and start playing away.

Get The Most Out of Logic Pro Studio 9

4 May

Get The Most Out of Logic Pro Studio 9.

Get The Most Out of Logic Pro Studio 9

4 May

Logic pro comes with three new demo Projects from well-known artists. Here you can see artists  making use of the Arrange window’s new Notes area.
A new release of Logic is always cause for excitement. For myself, part of this reaction can perhaps be attributed to nostalgia: I’ve been using the software  since  1998, with fond memories of each subsequent upgrade. Since then it’s undergone many changes, not least  and like its version 8 predecessor, Logic Pro 9 ships as part of a bundle with Main Stage, the application designed to facilitate the use of Logic’s instruments and effects in a live rig, and Soundtrack Pro, a separate program designed for those working with audio for media post-production. This review will, for the most part, concentrate on Logic Pro 9, and we’ll look at the remaining parts of the bundle in a future issue.
The Paperless Studio
The first change in the new Logic Studio bundle will strike you the moment you see the packaging. The box is significantly smaller than before, which raises the question: where did those large printed manuals go?
One is an installation guide, while the other two are so-called ‘exploration’ guides for Logic Pro 9 and Main Stage 2. Thankfully, these were also made available as PDF files a month or so after the initial Logic 9 launch.
A surprising omission is the lack of a document describing only the new features, as has been supplied with previous versions. For existing users, it’s quite handy to read about the new features, especially when investigating smaller changes such as new key commands, and I really hope Apple fill this void at some point.
Logic Studio is still supplied on an almost overwhelming number of DVDs– nine in total, one more than before– and accompanying the applications themselves is an abounding quantity of content, including a complete set of Apple’s Jam sound libraries. In addition to the original five Jam you now also get the latest Voices Pack as well, and in fact it would cost more to purchase these Packs separately than to buy Logic Studio itself!
You’ll need to put aside an hour if you choose to install everything, depending on the speed of your optical drive, and I find it handy to create disk images of Logic Studio’s media with Disk Utility. While this is also a laborious endeavor, every subsequent installation of Logic is significantly faster, as you can simply mount all of the images, run the installer, and come back in less than 15 minutes with the procedure complete.

Logic pro comes with three new demo Projects from well-known artists. A new release of Logic is always cause for excitement. Since then it’s undergone many changes, not least  Logic Pro 9 ships as part of a bundle with Main Stage, the application designed to facilitate the use of Logic’s instruments and effects in a studio Imagelive rig, and Soundtrack Pro, a separate program designed for those working with audio for media post-production. Thankfully, these were also made available as PDF files a month or so after the initial Logic 9 launch.